Tim Draxl sings Chet Baker publicity shot

Tim Draxl sings Chet Baker

Tim Draxl sings Chet Baker publicity shot

Tim Draxl sings Chet Baker publicity shot

As soon as I saw it advertised, I booked tickets straight away. It was an evening at one of my favourite cabaret bars in Sydney – Bar Me – featuring one of my favourite cabaret singers – Tim Draxl – doing the works of one of my favourite jazz musicians – Chet Baker – so how could I go wrong?

Colin, Grant and I had seen Tim Draxl perform and talk about the works of Chet Baker in August last year. As he noted when he performed, it was the night of the Bledisloe Cup. Amusingly, it was another footy night in Sydney, with the NRL Grand Final action many kilometres away at Homebush.

Michael Tyack and Tim Draxl at Supper Club

Michael Tyack and Tim Draxl at Supper Club, when Tim previously spoke and sang about Chet Baker

As the crowd was packed into the stadium there, so too, were we packed in to Bar Me. I don’t know how many people were in the small, cellar-style venue in Kings Cross, but I’m reasonably pleased there wasn’t a fire or an evacuation. We had great seats, but it sure was tight. And it was warm.

But at the same time, it was a great venue for the show, dealing as it did with the story of 1950s jazz musician who was described as “The James Dean Of Jazz”.

Whether or not that was hype remains open to discussion, but he was certainly an interesting character, with his rather curious family upbringing, his heavy use of a wide range of drugs, and speculation about his sexuality.

Throughout the show Tim Draxl talks a bit about Baker’s sexuality, ranging from teenage poofter-bashing at school, to early twenties “partying hard” (was that a euphemism?), and to a later emphatic denial of homosexuality when he plays Baker in character.

Early in the piece, though, Tim sang the song “My Buddy” with such an urgent sexuality, that you couldn’t help but be down the path of speculation…

As a performer, Tim Draxl continues to grow. Every time I see him, he gets better. He gets more honest. He gets more real. He still holds something of himself back, though. And in tonight’s show he spoke about how that’s why he likes Baker – that he was somewhat of an introvert too. One day I’d like to see Tim really drop his guard, really open up. I’m sure that will happen one day.

Whenever I see him perform, though, I’m reminded of the young man I interviewed when he was 18 or 19 on ABC Radio. He seemed to have a lot of self-control/reserve even then.


Looks like the work of Luke Temby on the walls of Surry Hills

Sat On My Lap

Cupco - the work of Luke Temby on the walls of Surry Hills

Cupco - the work of Luke Temby on the walls of Surry Hills

As Kate and I walked around the streets of Chippendale, we noticed posters featuring artwork by Luke Temby.

I noticed another one tonight as I came home from dinner at Emad’s on Cleveland Street.

The art group I belong to has bought a couple of works by Temby, and he has created this crazy kind of universe called Cupco. It was interesting to see his works out and about on the streets, as well as in the galleries.

Kate was into town for a couple of exhibitions, including one we saw together at Seymour Centre which focussed on Sydney experimental and electronic music of the early 1980s, as part of Sydney Festival. It was so-so.

But it was good to see Kate.

It was also a lovely dinner at Emad’s by the way, along with Colin and a couple of his friends. Colin used to work with the husband, and now, retired, he and his wife are having a whale of a time travelling the world “while they still can”.

We had just been to see “The Fabulous Frances Faye” downstairs at Belvoir Street.

Part of the set from the Fabulous Frances Faye at Belvoir Street

Part of the set from the Fabulous Frances Faye at Belvoir Street

I’d first heard about the show maybe six months ago when a cabaret-type I know came back from Adelaide raving about the show.

Fellow blogger, Yani, has also seen the show.

In that instance, Yani was the audience participation in the show, as was I tonight.

Prior to this, I’d heard the name Frances Faye before, but had no recognition of who she was.

Her connection with Australia, it seems, was a strong one, as she played here on many occasions, including her final performances on stage and television before she died.

The closest modern parallel, in some ways, would be Bette Midler. Not in a “Wind Beneath My Wings” sense, but in the sense of Bette’s cabaret act, combining strong showmanship, excellent musicianship, and a lovely bawdiness. And, back in 1960s Australia, she was apparently, popular with the gays.

The guy doing the show, Nick Christo, performs as Frances, though not in a frock. Dressed in a suit, he performs “a show” as Frances, seeking to capture the essence of her work, rather than engage in the art of female impersonation.

And he’s bloody fantastic. He’s a wonderful performer, who sings well, is comfortable in his body as he moves throughout the show, and who effortlessly takes you into the world of 1960s cabaret, epitomised by the likes of clubs like Chequers.

Towards the end, like Yani, I became the subject of a bit of audience participation as he sang and then sat on my lap.

It wasn’t an especially well-attended show, with an audience of maybe 40 downstairs at Belvoir. The audience was, however, enthusiastic, and there was a great buzz in the room. As everyone left there were smiles all round.

It was a wonderful show that’s opened my eyes to the work of the fabulous Frances Faye.


Grant and Tim

What will Tim Draxl do next?

Colin and Tim

Colin and Tim

About half way through tonight’s show by Tim Draxl at The Civic I found my mind wandering.

“What’s he going to do next?”, I thought to myself, adding “He’s done music, cabaret, films. Where’s his headspace at?”.

Minutes later he articulated my very thoughts.

“A lot of people have wondered what am I going to do next? So have I”, he said, adding that he felt exhilarated by the uncertainty of his career at the moment.

He’s a great singer, but somehow, deep own, you get the feeling his heart isn’t in it.

He’s a good actor, but apart from the occasional good role, he’s appeared in quite a few dodgy films and shows.

Personally, I’d love him to concentrate on singing. The best singers, in my opinion, usually have a theatrical quality about them.

Unlike many of the singers you see on television these days – last night’s American Idol for example – the best singers are those who put their heart and soul into a song. Those who can sing a song, hitting the notes and drawing upon deep emotions, and who don’t need to rely on vocal gymnastics to impress.

Tim Draxl is such a performer.

Grant and Tim

Grant and Tim

He talked tonight about having sung a song when he was young and not making much of a fist of it, primarily because he hadn’t experienced love at that time in his life. He said that he hoped he would sing it better tonight because he had learned so much more from life. And he did.

You still get the feeling, though, he’s holding back. Although he sings beautifully, you still get the feeling there’s a lot more he could share.

And if you could combine the natural talent he has, along with the hard work he has put into his career, along with a little more raw emotion, you just know he would be a GREAT performer.

That said, it was a good show tonight, and one which Colin, Grant and I enjoyed very much.

The Civic is a great venue. Dinner was excellent. The show was only before about 60 people, so it was intimate. A good night was had by all.