Never Plan Too Much

I started the day with a vague plan to attend some of the events at Stockholm Pride. There was the Opening Ceremony, a Salsa Dance Class, and a talk about the experiences of refugees arriving in Sweden. For whatever reason, I never made it to any of those events.

Instead, I started the day visiting the Glass Is Tomorrow exhibition at the National Museum Of Design. Sweden, of course, has a world-class reputation for glass manufacturing and glass art, and the exhibition lives up to that reputation, and from there I wandered to the Nordiska Museet, which I’ve blogged about elsewhere.

Glass is Tomorrow Exhibition at Kulturhuset, Stockholm
Glass is Tomorrow Exhibition at Kulturhuset, Stockholm
Glass is Tomorrow Exhibition at Kulturhuset, Stockholm
Glass is Tomorrow Exhibition at Kulturhuset, Stockholm
Glass is Tomorrow Exhibition at Kulturhuset, Stockholm
Glass is Tomorrow Exhibition at Kulturhuset, Stockholm

On leaving the Nordiska Museet, I had only a vague plan of walking towards Gröna Lund and catching the ferry. But rather than walk along the main thoroughfare, I took a turn to the right. That’s when I saw an elderly couple.

My interest was piqued, when I saw them open and close (very carefully) a nearby gate. As I headed towards them, I noticed they were entering a graveyard. As I’m a great fan of graveyards (nothing ghoulish, the history), I followed them in, only to discover the most wonderful space on Djurgården, I didn’t know existed. It’s clearly a graveyard for Stockholm’s “well to do”, with lots of graves for sea captains and the like.

Graveyard near the Vasa Museet and the Nordiska Museet in Stockholm
Graveyard near the Vasa Museet and the Nordiska Museet in Stockholm

But there were also a couple of other graves which really touched me, such as a dual grave for twins born a few years ago, and who both died within a few months of each other. And there’s a multi-person grave for some people who all died in a plane crash over the Baltic Sea. It’s a beautiful, peaceful place, in a space I didn’t expect to find it. So if you’re visiting Djurgården, it’s definitely worth a look, located between the Nordiska and Vasa museums.

After staying there a while, I continued my journey towards Gröna Lund. However, it wasn’t long before I became distracted again, by a sign mentioning a beer garden selling “Swedish Craft Beer”.

Beer from The Swedish Association of Independent Breweries at the Spiritmuseet, Stockholm
Beer from The Swedish Association of Independent Breweries at the Spiritmuseet, Stockholm

Though I didn’t pay a visit to the museum itself, there’s an exhibition right now at Stockholm’s Spirit Museum about Sweden’s “difficult relationship” (their words, not mine) with alcohol. Co-inciding with that, their beer garden is featuring 15 beers from The Swedish Association of Independent Breweries. Overlooking the water, and as the sun began to shine, I couldn’t have planned it better.

Author: James O'Brien

Born / Currently : Lismore / Widjabul Wia-Bal - Bundjalung Live : Sydney / Gadigal - Eora Also : Brisbane, Bourke, Renmark, Wagga, Perth Pronouns : He/him/his.

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